But the climate regime is complex and raises many other questions. Thus, it is recommended that the scientist, politician or other interested lay people turn to this volume. To my knowledge, there is no other volume that guides the reader in such detail through the history of the Paris Agreement, its provisions, strengths and weaknesses, and its major implications for and its role in international law. In conjunction with international climate change legislation (Bodansky, Brunea & Rajamani, Bodansky reference, Brunea and Rajamani2017), the reader is updated on the why, how, who and what of international climate legislation. Although funding is not explicitly linked to the NCNs, the provision of financial resources by the Parties to industrialized countries to assist the Parties to developing countries, both in terms of monitoring and adaptation, is a requirement of the Agreement and is an integral part of its objective.22 While the Parties are ”encouraged” to provide or continue to provide such assistance voluntarily; Twenty-three parties to developed countries should continue to take the lead in ”mobilizing” climate finance through a wide range of sources, instruments and channels.24 This should go beyond previous efforts and aim to strike a balance between adjustment and mitigation25 In this sense, we address the opening of this meeting. namely to US President Trump and the degree of injustice of the Paris Agreement towards the United States. Of course, the United States is frequent during the book. But contrary to Trump`s claims, the regime does not disadvantage anyone in any way, really. If the principle of ”common but differentiated responsibilities and capabilities” were considered to be detrimental to the United States, this would of course be understandable. But given the eloquence of this principle within the agreement and the careful elaboration of each provision, it is not possible to see a disadvantage of the United States compared to other states. Each state of course considers its own (drawbacks) within the climate regime, but as the book so beautifully shows, in the Paris Agreement, all parties work together to address the threats to climate change. The most important climate agreement in history, the Paris Agreement on climate change, is the commitment of the nations of the world to tackle and stem climate change. Signed in December 2015, it entered into force on 4 November 2016.

Countries are moving towards implementation and efforts will be needed at all levels to achieve their ambitious goals. The Paris Climate Agreement: commentary and analysis combine a comprehensive legal assessment and criticisms of the new agreement with a practical and structured commentary on all its articles. The first part discusses the general context of the Paris Agreement, describes the scientific, political and social drivers behind them, provides an overview of the existing regime and follows the history of the negotiations. It examines the development of key concepts such as common but differentiated competences and analyses the legal form of the agreement and the nature of its provisions. . . .